Statement on U.S. Senate Candidate Roy S. Moore

One of the fruits of America’s culture of libertine sexuality is the horror of sexual assault and abuse of women and girls.  This year their cries broke through the walls that America’s culture shapers in Hollywood, Nashville, New York, and Washington, D.C. have built to protect their open secrets.  The Constitution Party of Georgia has long advocated raising up men and women of integrity who are accountable to God and the people in their public and private lives, and will work to protect women and children from being violated by predators.

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“Bring Your Guns to Church” Sunday

I originally wrote most of this in 2009. I updated it in 2015. The warnings and advice here are tragically illustrated in this terrible attack. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the victims in Southerland Springs, and our admonition go out to all.


Gun-and-BibleImagine the following scenario: At church this Sunday, while reviewing the list of announcements and upcoming events for your church, your pastor adds, “Oh, and don’t forget: on Sundays we have our regular target practice. Make sure to bring your guns. Make sure to bring your pieces to church.”

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The Harvest Festival of Thanksgiving

By Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director
Plymouth Rock Foundation
 

At this time of year many people reflect upon the Pilgrims and the origin of our American Thanksgiving holiday. Some contend that it either never occurred or was not a friendly affair with a legacy of genocide. Hopefully some context and clarity can help remove these myths and bring factual balance. Consider some of these facts: (1) We do not know when the actual harvest feast occurred, though we know it was the fall of 1621. (2) We don't know if the Pilgrims invited their Native neighbors to a pre-planned event, but we know they feasted together. (3) The Natives provided much of the food, and though they had turkey, venison ruled the day.

 
The Pilgrims (who were not called "pilgrims" until late in the 18th century), as children of the Reformation, "separatists" from the established Church of England, called for days of prayer as well as days of thanksgiving. Days of solemn prayer (and often fasting) were times of repentance for sin; known or unknown. Days of thanksgiving were called when specific answers to those prayers occurred. Neither of these was the origin of the harvest festival in the fall of 1621.
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