CP-Ga Lauds Moore for Calling Granade’s Legal Bluff

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 9, 2015
Contact: Ricardo Davis, 404-620-2440

ATLANTA, GA – The Constitution Party of Georgia stands with Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy S. Moore in his actions to uphold the rule of law by calling Federal District Judge Granade’s legal bluff.

State Chairman Ricardo Davis noted, “Moore’s publicly available letter to the Probate Judges was a straightforward and readable explanation of Granade’s actions and the law related to the Probate Judge. The bottom line: Granade’s order and subsequent clarification did not direct the state officials who are charged with the responsibility of issuing marriage licenses to do anything. The injunction only applies to the sole defendant in the case, the Alabama Attorney General.”

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Constitution Party Supports Chick-Fil-A Stand on Marriage

Rebekah_Davis on WSB-TVOutside a Cobb County Chick-fil-A, a representative from a conservative Christian group told Davis she supports the biblical definition of marriage and family and Cathy.

“We believe he should be able to express that without other groups coming in and trying to, you know, hurt his business,” said Rebekah Davis of the Constitution Party of Georgia...

See the full report from WSB-TV reporter Diana Davis


Constitution and Green Parties File Georgia Lawsuit

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Garland Favorito (404) 664-4044

ATLANTA, GA – The Constitution Party of Georgia and the Green Party of Georgia filed a federal lawsuit on Friday attempting to force Secretary of State, Brian Kemp, to list their Presidential candidates on the 2012 ballot. The lawsuit is similar to recent suits that were successful in Ohio and Tennessee. [Click for Lawsuit]

The parties’ Presidential candidates have been listed in more than 40 states during some previous elections but have never appeared on the ballot in Georgia. For Georgia elections the candidate names must be written in on the ballot. Questions have arisen in the past as to whether the state has counted these write-in votes correctly and completely as required.

The parties have historically been unable to gather enough validated petition signatures to be listed on the ballot according to Georgia law. In 1996, nearly 65,000 signatures were collected but ballot access was still denied after the office of the Secretary of State invalidated many of those signatures. In that case, the state contended that a petitioner and a notary must always be different individuals although the petitioning procedures mentioned no such requirement.

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